Uluru Northern Territory

The Beauty Of Australia’s Uluru (Ayres Rock)

Central Australia is home to one of the great natural wonders of the world. The image of the all-mighty Uluru (Ayres Rock) stuck in the middle of a sandy desert plain is one of the most recognized natural icons in the world.

The Beauty Of Australia’s Uluru (Ayres Rock)

Uluru Northern Territory

Once you get up close to the rock, though, you quickly realize that Uluru is more than just a big stone (which happens to be the largest rock in the world). It’s a natural monument, a landmark, a sacred site, and has its own specialized environment.

The Beauty Of Australia’s Uluru (Ayres Rock) Because Uluru is sacred to the Anangu, they request that people do not climb it. Many do anyway, of course, but the climb doesn’t come without risks. Because it is so steep, some climbers have slipped and fallen to their deaths; and because it gets so hot there in the summer, some have suffered seizures under the strain of reaching the top. Many others have also reported that after making it up there, they’ve been cursed. All good reasons to stay on the ground!

During our visit to Ayers Rock, we elected to see Uluru by having an Aboriginal guide take us around the six miles of paths that circle the rock. As we circled the monster stone, we passed by large watering holes and mini-forests of scrub brush; indeed, the rock acts almost like a mountain, creating different environments around it. Also surprising to us was that the rock wasn’t smooth; instead, it’s covered with cracks, crevices and consists of varying shades of reds and pinks.

Your guide explained to us that the Anangu make use of everything on the land, and will eat anything edible, including feral cats or honey ants — which he swore are quite tasty. He also noted that his people don’t merely view the cracks in Uluru as cracks; instead, each one has a story behind it and represents something in their history.

At the end of the day, we drove around the rock, admiring its massiveness and beauty as the sun set and it changed from a reddish orange to a deep rust. Though we came to the area to see only one thing, Uluru offers enough history and alure that we easily could’ve spent a week there exploring it. It’s a unique site and a worthy hallmark for Australia’s outback.

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